Life in the Spirit

Lead Us, Spirit

Romans 8:1-14 (NLT)

So now there is no condemnation for those who belong to Christ Jesus. And because you belong to him, the power of the life-giving Spirit has freed you from the power of sin that leads to death. The law of Moses was unable to save us because of the weakness of our sinful nature. So God did what the law could not do. He sent his own Son in a body like the bodies we sinners have. And in that body God declared an end to sin’s control over us by giving his Son as a sacrifice for our sins. He did this so that the just requirement of the law would be fully satisfied for us, who no longer follow our sinful nature but instead follow the Spirit.

Those who are dominated by the sinful nature think about sinful things, but those who are controlled by the Holy Spirit think about things that please the Spirit. So letting your sinful nature control your mind leads to death. But letting the Spirit control your mind leads to life and peace. For the sinful nature is always hostile to God. It never did obey God’s laws, and it never will. That’s why those who are still under the control of their sinful nature can never please God.

But you are not controlled by your sinful nature. You are controlled by the Spirit if you have the Spirit of God living in you. (And remember that those who do not have the Spirit of Christ living in them do not belong to him at all.) And Christ lives within you, so even though your body will die because of sin, the Spirit gives you life because you have been made right with God. The Spirit of God, who raised Jesus from the dead, lives in you. And just as God raised Christ Jesus from the dead, he will give life to your mortal bodies by this same Spirit living within you.

Therefore, dear brothers and sisters, you have no obligation to do what your sinful nature urges you to do. For if you live by its dictates, you will die. But if through the power of the Spirit you put to death the deeds of your sinful nature, you will live. For all who are led by the Spirit of God are children of God.


Last week, I preached about the spiritual war going on around us, and particularly, in our minds. There was a warning embedded there: Evil still contends for us, and we fall prey to sin if we do not take care.

I should point out that not all theologians would agree with the direction I chose for that sermon. Some think Paul was simply comparing his old life under the law with his new, holy life lived in God’s Spirit. They would argue that for a person truly saved, the lure and aggravation of sin should cease.

I disagree, of course. But there is a danger in what I preached last Sunday. The danger is we will say to ourselves, “I’m saved, but I’ll always go on sinning, and I guess I can just live with it.”

For Christians, learning to be content is generally a good thing. We should never be content with sin in our lives, however. Any present known sin should cause us great anguish. Sin should keep us awake at night.

And let me add something important: Our anguish should not be that of a frightened child awaiting punishment. Instead, we should be upset because sin is blocking us from living the truly free, joyous life we are offered on a daily basis.

It’s less about the fear of a whipping and more about the simple fact that our sour, worried stomachs won’t let us eat the cake already set before us. Ongoing sin keeps us from experiencing now the happiness and sense of blessed assurance that we will have for all eternity in the direct presence of God.

I hope the idea of a life without sin—a life without sin’s accompanying worry, fear of embarrassment, sense of shame, and feeling you have betrayed The One who loves you most—intrigues you. I hope that as you imagine such a life, you think, “I want that.”

I pray you take your relationship with God seriously enough to make the sinless life the major goal of your life.

Most of us do not live as if we have made such a choice. Kids have a saying these days: “Meh.” It means they’re uncommitted, neither impressed nor unimpressed. Wesley once preached about what he called “Almost Christians.” When I look around me, I see a lot of “meh” Christians.

For many, a relationship with God is one checkbox on a long list of life goals, and it often is not even the first item on the list. Such an approach to life is a far cry from what Paul is encouraging.

Paul wants us to understand what it means to live life in the Spirit, the capital-S Spirit, by fully experiencing that life. I probably need to pause here for just a second—does everyone know what we mean by God’s Spirit?

The Spirit is God, God moving through us and among us. We know God in other ways, mostly now as stories of God as Father and God as Son at work in the world. As we conclude this Easter season, we need to remember that the resurrected Jesus is not the end of the story, not even after he ascended into Heaven. By reconciling us to God, Jesus the Son made it possible for God to once again touch us directly, and God now does so through his Spirit.

So, a simple question: Will you let God’s Spirit lead? In every moment? In every matter?

Back to that checklist most of us have either on paper or in our heads. Try this: First, take “relationship with God” off of it completely. The moment we make it one part of the list, we’ve completely missed the point of the relationship.

Next, say to yourself, “My relationship with God is so important that I will put everything on that list under God’s authority.” Look at that list: “God, are these items this part of your will? God, are these goals really what you want for me? God, does all this serve you?”

Where you hear “no,” ditch those items. Where you hear “yes,” by all means, focus there! And don’t be surprised if God starts adding items to your list, possibilities that surprise you.

The answers may not be immediate or obvious, but if you’re sincere in your approach to a life in the Spirit, the answers will become clear over time.

A few basic truths in all of this: If you’re not developing a deeper understanding of what is in the Bible, it’s very hard for you to be living a life in the Spirit. God has been making his introductions and clarifying his will for thousands of years—why would anyone seeking a deeper understanding of God’s will not explore the Bible thoroughly?

If you’re not praying earnestly, don’t expect to be able to discern God’s will amidst the din of a very loud, sin-filled world.

If it is not a priority for you to be in deep, sincere fellowship with other Christians, sharing in the larger, corporate Christian life, then you’re being quite “meh” about whether you want a life in the Spirit. Remember the Spirit works among believers as well as in believers, and one of the greatest confirmations we can have of God’s presence is corporate unity in the Spirit. Occasionally, we find ourselves aligned not only with each other in the present but also with the faithful saints of the past, and we know something beautiful has happened.

Remember to what you are being invited: a remaking, a complete refurbishing of who you are. Paul tells us that God’s Spirit was the active, very personal force in the resurrection of Christ and will be the active personal force in our remaking after death. And even in this life, there are new gifts, new abilities, and new opportunities when we open ourselves to the Spirit’s leading.

Who wouldn’t want the power of such a relationship with God in our lives now?

Next Sunday, we will celebrate the Christian Pentecost, and we will continue to consider what it means to fully submit ourselves to God’s leadership through his Spirit.

 

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Mind Wars

Romans 7:14-25 (NLT)

So the trouble is not with the law, for it is spiritual and good. The trouble is with me, for I am all too human, a slave to sin. I don’t really understand myself, for I want to do what is right, but I don’t do it. Instead, I do what I hate. But if I know that what I am doing is wrong, this shows that I agree that the law is good. So I am not the one doing wrong; it is sin living in me that does it.

And I know that nothing good lives in me, that is, in my sinful nature. I want to do what is right, but I can’t. I want to do what is good, but I don’t. I don’t want to do what is wrong, but I do it anyway. But if I do what I don’t want to do, I am not really the one doing wrong; it is sin living in me that does it.

I have discovered this principle of life—that when I want to do what is right, I inevitably do what is wrong. I love God’s law with all my heart. But there is another power within me that is at war with my mind. This power makes me a slave to the sin that is still within me. Oh, what a miserable person I am! Who will free me from this life that is dominated by sin and death? Thank God! The answer is in Jesus Christ our Lord. So you see how it is: In my mind I really want to obey God’s law, but because of my sinful nature I am a slave to sin.


Most of us intuitively understand what Paul means when he writes, “I want to do what is is right, but I don’t do it. Instead, I do what I hate.” We’ve been there. We’ve done that.

His statement is, of course, in the context of his long conversation in Romans about the law, how it was given to us so we could better understand right and wrong. It also is rooted in a related thought he has been repeating, that we are too broken by our sinfulness to live holy lives by our own effort.

Paul also is moving us toward a deeper understanding of the spiritual world around us and how it influences us. For modern Christians, this concept may elude us a little. Some other Bible stories may help. Be sure to click the links to read the stories.

Daniel’s Tardy Angel

Daniel was praying to understand why his people remained in captivity. After three weeks of prayer and fasting, he received a vision and heard directly from an angel.

I’m not focusing on the vision, which had to do with revelations about the end times. Instead, I want to focus on the angel’s reason for taking three weeks to deliver the answer to Daniel’s prayers. He was delayed by an evil force, and ultimately the archangel Michael, known for his prowess in battle, had to arrive on the scene to make delivery of the message possible.

In this story, we receive a rare glimpse of what is usually unseen, the struggle between the forces of good and evil on a spiritual plane. And yes, what happens there affects world events.

The Sorcerer’s Folly

This story in Acts reminds us of how humans and evil spirits can combine forces to contend for the allegiance of one person, particularly if that person may have some worldly influence. The sorcerer’s motive is made clear in the text: He wanted to keep the governor from believing. The governor is described as an intelligent man, so we can presume this sorcerer kept his victim spellbound with an impressive bag of tricks, gifts from the evil spirits who worked within and alongside the sorcerer.

Paul dealt with the situation head on, trusting in the Holy Spirit to take the lead. He declared precisely for whom the sorcerer worked. The Holy Spirit won out, and the governor became a true believer.

Porcine Possession

Modern people often want to re-orient biblical stories about the spiritual world toward a more modern understanding of events, chalking up behaviors seen in the Bible to epilepsy or mental illness.

Yes, epilepsy and mental illness are very real conditions that can occur in our broken bodies. But at the same time, there are stories in the Bible that show us the negative direct effects spiritual powers can have upon us.

The demons in this story know Jesus’ full identity more clearly than any of the disciples would have known at this time. And yet the demons are pulling hard in the other direction, wreaking havoc in the lives of these two men in need of healing.

Modern minds also should note that mental illness is not directly transferable to pigs. This story is rooted in the spiritual world, not a medical journal.

The Victorious Life

Spiritual evil is real. It has a powerful influence on our lives, and the battle for our minds is real and should not be ignored. For a Christian seeking truth in Scripture, these are undeniable biblical principles.

Paul initially joins us in a universal lament, acknowledging the despair we can feel. “Oh, what a miserable person I am! Who will free me from this life that is dominated by sin and death!”

But remember the core message of Romans: We are freed from the trap. Christ’s death on the cross and ensuing resurrection represent a victory over sin and death we could not win. Through belief, we gain a new power.

Often as Christians, we focus on the moment of belief, the day and time we were saved. As we proceed in Romans, however, Paul is going to tell us more about how we tap into and use the power we are graciously given by our loving God. We are going to learn from Paul how to grow in strength as we contend with evil every day.

We are about to learn how to live life in the Spirit.


The featured image is a detail of Michael the archangel, from a 1488 painting by Bartolomeo Vivarini.