Sanctifying Grace

The Explorer’s Sacrifice

Romans 12:1-2 (NLT)

And so, dear brothers and sisters, I plead with you to give your bodies to God because of all he has done for you. Let them be a living and holy sacrifice—the kind he will find acceptable. This is truly the way to worship him. Don’t copy the behavior and customs of this world, but let God transform you into a new person by changing the way you think. Then you will learn to know God’s will for you, which is good and pleasing and perfect.


We are entering a new section of Romans, one where Paul talks extensively about the long-term Christian life—the ongoing post-conversion changes we should all experience.

Yes, we are saved by simple faith, by believing in the proven work Jesus Christ has done on the cross. Our belief is enough to save us. But is there more to do?

Yes, of course there is. We have received a gift so great we cannot fully comprehend it, the gift of eternal life, Paul is saying. If we properly understand the gift, we turn our lives into a giant thank-you note to God.

We give our bodies, conforming our behaviors to his will as closely as possible. We surrender our minds, letting God’s Spirit work in us and change our very thought patterns through prayer and Scripture.

Most of us like the part about God’s grace being freely given, the fact that salvation is a simple matter of belief. But when it comes to thinking about ongoing discipleship—about actual change—well, we’re not always so receptive. The Christian life starts to sound like work.

There’s a term for when we accept the gift but offer no response, no thanks, no real change in our minds and hearts. Dietrich Bonhoeffer, a German theologian martyred by Adolph Hitler and the Nazis in World War II, called such an attitude “cheap grace.”

“Cheap grace is the grace we bestow upon ourselves. Cheap grace is the preaching of forgiveness without requiring repentance, baptism without church discipline, Communion without confession. … Cheap grace is grace without discipleship, grace without the cross, grace without Jesus Christ, living and incarnate.”

I suppose I could just stop here, hoping to shame us into responding more fully to God’s grace, the way our parents might have guilted us into writing a thank-you note for a nice present we received. I think I can make all of this a little more palatable, however. Perhaps we can even become excited about this new section of Romans.

We are called to give up some attitudes and behaviors when we become Christians. We are not left with a void, however; God replaces the lesser behaviors and thoughts we surrender with even more gifts.

We are being invited to explore the kingdom that is dawning now, even before it is present in full. Like any explorer, we have to sacrifice the stuff that weighs us down if we are going to find something new, something that will change us to the core.*

We do respond to God simply as an act of thanks. We repent of what separates us from him. We pray and search the Scripture to try to understand how to better please our Creator, Redeemer and Sustainer. God doesn’t just receive our thank-you notes and flip them on the kitchen table with the rest of his mail, however. He gets excited by our response.

God says, “What else can I do for you? It is such a joy to have you a part of my plan! What do you want to know next? What do you want to do next?”

“How can I help you be the best you you can be?”

And God changes you some more. And you see where you used to be and where you are now, and you give more thanks. And God changes you even more!

It is a glorious cycle, one spiraling us toward heaven. Pretty soon, all that stuff we gave up, all that stuff we thought was so important, is simply scattered on the ground far below us, as forgettable as yesterday’s garbage.

If you don’t believe me—well, just try to fulfill Paul’s plea for a time. Six months, a year, something substantial. Make God’s word part of your life. Talk to him in prayer.

And certainly, most certainly, give up those behaviors that you know are not of his will. We have a short word for those behaviors: sin. Stop sinning. Ask God for the strength you need to stop.

Paul is not asking us to suffer. No, not at all. Instead, he’s asking us to live fully. We free ourselves to accept the further gifts to come, the gifts that gild our salvation.


*If you want to explore the backpack metaphor further, John Bunyan’s “The Pilgrim’s Progress” is a good place to start.

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Lead Us, Spirit

Romans 8:1-14 (NLT)

So now there is no condemnation for those who belong to Christ Jesus. And because you belong to him, the power of the life-giving Spirit has freed you from the power of sin that leads to death. The law of Moses was unable to save us because of the weakness of our sinful nature. So God did what the law could not do. He sent his own Son in a body like the bodies we sinners have. And in that body God declared an end to sin’s control over us by giving his Son as a sacrifice for our sins. He did this so that the just requirement of the law would be fully satisfied for us, who no longer follow our sinful nature but instead follow the Spirit.

Those who are dominated by the sinful nature think about sinful things, but those who are controlled by the Holy Spirit think about things that please the Spirit. So letting your sinful nature control your mind leads to death. But letting the Spirit control your mind leads to life and peace. For the sinful nature is always hostile to God. It never did obey God’s laws, and it never will. That’s why those who are still under the control of their sinful nature can never please God.

But you are not controlled by your sinful nature. You are controlled by the Spirit if you have the Spirit of God living in you. (And remember that those who do not have the Spirit of Christ living in them do not belong to him at all.) And Christ lives within you, so even though your body will die because of sin, the Spirit gives you life because you have been made right with God. The Spirit of God, who raised Jesus from the dead, lives in you. And just as God raised Christ Jesus from the dead, he will give life to your mortal bodies by this same Spirit living within you.

Therefore, dear brothers and sisters, you have no obligation to do what your sinful nature urges you to do. For if you live by its dictates, you will die. But if through the power of the Spirit you put to death the deeds of your sinful nature, you will live. For all who are led by the Spirit of God are children of God.


Last week, I preached about the spiritual war going on around us, and particularly, in our minds. There was a warning embedded there: Evil still contends for us, and we fall prey to sin if we do not take care.

I should point out that not all theologians would agree with the direction I chose for that sermon. Some think Paul was simply comparing his old life under the law with his new, holy life lived in God’s Spirit. They would argue that for a person truly saved, the lure and aggravation of sin should cease.

I disagree, of course. But there is a danger in what I preached last Sunday. The danger is we will say to ourselves, “I’m saved, but I’ll always go on sinning, and I guess I can just live with it.”

For Christians, learning to be content is generally a good thing. We should never be content with sin in our lives, however. Any present known sin should cause us great anguish. Sin should keep us awake at night.

And let me add something important: Our anguish should not be that of a frightened child awaiting punishment. Instead, we should be upset because sin is blocking us from living the truly free, joyous life we are offered on a daily basis.

It’s less about the fear of a whipping and more about the simple fact that our sour, worried stomachs won’t let us eat the cake already set before us. Ongoing sin keeps us from experiencing now the happiness and sense of blessed assurance that we will have for all eternity in the direct presence of God.

I hope the idea of a life without sin—a life without sin’s accompanying worry, fear of embarrassment, sense of shame, and feeling you have betrayed The One who loves you most—intrigues you. I hope that as you imagine such a life, you think, “I want that.”

I pray you take your relationship with God seriously enough to make the sinless life the major goal of your life.

Most of us do not live as if we have made such a choice. Kids have a saying these days: “Meh.” It means they’re uncommitted, neither impressed nor unimpressed. Wesley once preached about what he called “Almost Christians.” When I look around me, I see a lot of “meh” Christians.

For many, a relationship with God is one checkbox on a long list of life goals, and it often is not even the first item on the list. Such an approach to life is a far cry from what Paul is encouraging.

Paul wants us to understand what it means to live life in the Spirit, the capital-S Spirit, by fully experiencing that life. I probably need to pause here for just a second—does everyone know what we mean by God’s Spirit?

The Spirit is God, God moving through us and among us. We know God in other ways, mostly now as stories of God as Father and God as Son at work in the world. As we conclude this Easter season, we need to remember that the resurrected Jesus is not the end of the story, not even after he ascended into Heaven. By reconciling us to God, Jesus the Son made it possible for God to once again touch us directly, and God now does so through his Spirit.

So, a simple question: Will you let God’s Spirit lead? In every moment? In every matter?

Back to that checklist most of us have either on paper or in our heads. Try this: First, take “relationship with God” off of it completely. The moment we make it one part of the list, we’ve completely missed the point of the relationship.

Next, say to yourself, “My relationship with God is so important that I will put everything on that list under God’s authority.” Look at that list: “God, are these items this part of your will? God, are these goals really what you want for me? God, does all this serve you?”

Where you hear “no,” ditch those items. Where you hear “yes,” by all means, focus there! And don’t be surprised if God starts adding items to your list, possibilities that surprise you.

The answers may not be immediate or obvious, but if you’re sincere in your approach to a life in the Spirit, the answers will become clear over time.

A few basic truths in all of this: If you’re not developing a deeper understanding of what is in the Bible, it’s very hard for you to be living a life in the Spirit. God has been making his introductions and clarifying his will for thousands of years—why would anyone seeking a deeper understanding of God’s will not explore the Bible thoroughly?

If you’re not praying earnestly, don’t expect to be able to discern God’s will amidst the din of a very loud, sin-filled world.

If it is not a priority for you to be in deep, sincere fellowship with other Christians, sharing in the larger, corporate Christian life, then you’re being quite “meh” about whether you want a life in the Spirit. Remember the Spirit works among believers as well as in believers, and one of the greatest confirmations we can have of God’s presence is corporate unity in the Spirit. Occasionally, we find ourselves aligned not only with each other in the present but also with the faithful saints of the past, and we know something beautiful has happened.

Remember to what you are being invited: a remaking, a complete refurbishing of who you are. Paul tells us that God’s Spirit was the active, very personal force in the resurrection of Christ and will be the active personal force in our remaking after death. And even in this life, there are new gifts, new abilities, and new opportunities when we open ourselves to the Spirit’s leading.

Who wouldn’t want the power of such a relationship with God in our lives now?

Next Sunday, we will celebrate the Christian Pentecost, and we will continue to consider what it means to fully submit ourselves to God’s leadership through his Spirit.